CFP: Retranslation in Context III: An international conference on retranslation

CFP: Retranslation in Context III.

An international conference on retranslation.

Ghent University (Belgium)

7-8 February, 2017

 

Retranslation is commonly associated with a dual focus: “the act of translating a work that has previously been translated into the same language” and “the result of such an act, i.e. the retranslated text itself” (Tahir Gürça?lar 2009, 233). The activity and its products have constituted a considerable share of the global translation market since the Middle Ages. Canonical literary works as well as religious, political, and philosophical texts have always been translated and retranslated into several languages, and this is clearly still the case in many cultures. However, in spite of the large corpus of retranslations that may thus be available for research purposes, the field has only recently developed into a serious topic of inquiry in the context of Translation Studies. Academic discussion of the retranslation of literary works was actually initiated in 1990, when Bensimon and Berman edited a special issue of Palimpsestes on ‘Retraduire’, in which they raised some of the central research topics of what was later coined Retranslation Theory (cf. Brownlie 2006). The phenomenon has steadily attracted research attention in recent years, with the entry ‘Retranslation’ being added to the second edition of the Routledge Encyclopedia of Translation Studies in 2009 and Koskinen & Paloposki’s chapter in the Handbook of Translation Studies (2010). More recently, Deane-Cox (2014) devoted a monograph to the topic of literary retranslation and also Target published a special issue on “Voice in Retranslation” in 2015, edited by Alvstad and Assis Rosa.

 

Building on the young tradition of Retranslation in Context conferences organized at Bo?aziçi University, Istanbul, (December 2013 and November 2015), we are delighted to announce the Retranslation in Context III Conference (RiC3), to be held at Ghent University (Belgium) on 7th and 8th February 2017.

 

As was correctly highlighted by Paloposki and Koskinen (2010, 30-31), retranslation is “a field of study that has been touched from many angles but not properly mapped out, and in which there exist a number of intuitive assumptions which have not been thoroughly studied.” The aim of the third RiC conference is to bring together researchers with multidisciplinary backgrounds in order to collect a more comprehensive body of material on retranslation and develop a profound understanding of the processes behind the decision to retranslate. We welcome cases studies on different aspects of retranslation, as well as more methodological approaches. The findings of practice-based research will be confronted with theoretical insights.

 

Themes that are still insufficiently researched in Translation Studies include the history of literary retranslation and its relationship to the history of literary translation, the role of the different agents involved and the importance of retranslation in the canonization process of world literature. A number of different motives for retranslation have been defined, but some of them (e.g. ageing) lack empirical underpinning. Data are also lacking on the cost-effectiveness of publishers’ investments in retranslations of literary works and on readers’ appreciation of the (expected) improvement. Specific research into the reception of retranslated works could shed some light on that question. In a number of cases translators decide to self-retranslate a text: how is this reflected in the paratext and to what extent is the translator willing to ‘correct’ his/her own translation? Also a number of macro-level issues invite further reflection: do central and peripheral literary systems adopt different policies toward retranslation? Are retranslations fundamentally different from earlier translations, or would it be more accurate to regard them as revisions, and how is this related to questions of authorship and plagiarism?

 

While research into retranslation has primarily focussed on literary translation, the conference aims at including a range of different genres to broaden the concept. Political and philosophical discourse as well as media discourse actively shape our cultures and mindsets. These types of discourse actively circulate in translation, but they are also sensitive to different kinds of manipulation and censorship prompting the need for retranslation.

 

We welcome contributions for 20-minute papers addressing any aspects of the above themes. Topics may include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Retranslation history and canon(ization)
  • Motives for retranslation (ageing, ideology, …)
  • Reception of retranslations
  • Self-retranslation
  • Retranslation in the literary system (centre vs. periphery)
  • Retranslation ethics (authorship, plagiarism, copyright)
  • Retranslation of historical, political, philosophical texts
  • Retranslation of media (including film, music, theatre)

 

References:

Alvstad, C., Assis Rosa, A. (2015). “Voice in retranslation. An overview and some trends.” Target 27 (1), 3-24.

Bensimon, P. (1990). “Présentation.” Palimpsestes 4, ix–xiii.

Berman, A. (1990). “La Retraduction comme espace de traduction.” Palimpsestes 4, 1–7.

Brownlie, S. (2006). “Narrative theory and retranslation theory.” Across Languages and Cultures 7 (2), 145-170.

Deane-Cox, S. (2014). Retranslation. Translation, Literature and Reinterpretation. London/New Delhi/New York/Sydney: Bloomsbury.

Koskinen, K., Paloposki, O. (2010). “Retranslation.” In Y. Gambier, L. van Doorslaer (eds) Handbook of Translation Studies, Volume 1. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins, 294–298.

Paloposki, O., Koskinen, K. (2010). “Reprocessing texts. The Fine Line between Retranslating and Revising.” Across Languages and Cultures 11 (1), 29-49.

Tahir Gürça?lar, ?. (2009). “Retranslation.” In M. Baker, G. Saldanha (eds) Routledge Encyclopedia of Translation Studies. Second edition. London/New York: Routledge, 233-236.

 

Organizing Institutions:

Free University of Brussels (VUB)

Ghent University (UGent)

Centre for Literature in Translation (CLIV)

The Centre for Literature in Translation is an interuniversity research group, affiliated to both the Free University of Brussels (VUB) and Ghent University (see http://www.cliv.be).

 

Conference website: http://www.cliv.be/en/retranslationincontext3/

 

Working Languages: English, French and Dutch

 

Invited speakers:

Özlem Berk Albachten (Bo?aziçi University)

Kaisa Koskinen (University of Eastern Finland)

Outi Paloposki (University of Turku)

 

Organizing Committee:

Sonja Lavaert (VUB)

Arvi Sepp (VUB & UAntwerpen)

Yves T’Sjoen (UGent)

Piet Van Poucke (UGent)

 

Scientific Committee:

Özlem Berk Albachten (Bo?aziçi University)

Cecilia Alvstad (CLIV, University of Oslo)

Alexandra Assis Rosa (University of Lisbon)

Michael Boyden (CLIV, Uppsala University)

Sharon Deane-Cox (University of Edinburgh)

Philippe Humblé (CLIV, Free University of Brussels)

Natalia Kaloh Vid (CLIV, University of Maribor)

Kaisa Koskinen (University of Eastern Finland)

Ilse Logie (CLIV, Ghent University)

Eric Metz (Universiteit van Amsterdam)

Reine Meylaerts (KULeuven)

Outi Paloposki (University of Turku)

?ehnaz Tahir Gürça?lar (Bo?aziçi University)

Andrew Samuel Walsh (Universidad Pontificia de Comillas, Madrid)

Patricia Willson (CLIV, University of Liège)

 

Please send abstracts of no more than 300 words, in English, French or Dutch, including a short bio note (max. 150 words) to retranslation@UGent.be by 1 July, 2016.

Notification of acceptance: 1 August, 2016.

 

Please note there will be a conference fee of 100 Euro.

 

A publication of the proceedings with selected contributions is planned.

 

===

 

Appel à contributions : Retranslation in Context III.

Conférence internationale sur la retraduction

Universiteit Gent (Belgique)

les 7 et 8 février 2017

 

Paul Bensimon et Anoine Berman avaient en 1990 consacré un numéro de la revue Palimpsestes à la thématique du “Retraduire”, en y abordant d’emblée un certain nombre de topiques de ce qui relève désormais de la “théorie de la retraduction” ou “Retranslation Theory” (cf. Brownlie 2006). Le concept de retraduction se comprend dans sa double acception qui recouvre d’une part l’acte consistant à traduire un texte qui a déjà été traduit antérieurement dans une même langue et d’autre part le résultat de cet acte, le texte retraduit à proprement parler (Tahir Gürça?lar 2009, 233). Le phénomène est révélateur de l’enjeu traductif et se pratique partout dans le monde : depuis toujours les “classiques” littéraires, mais aussi de nombreux textes religieux, politiques ou philosophiques ont dans bien des cultures et bien des langues fait l’objet de traductions se superposant les unes aux autres. Quoique les matériaux existants soient abondants, la traductologie ne s’est penchée que récemment sur l’existence de la retraduction qui désormais intrigue les chercheurs. L’entrée “Retranslation“, absente encore dans sa première édition de 1998, a fait son apparition en 2009 dans la Routledge Encyclopedia of Translation Studies et Koskinen & Paloposki sont les auteurs d’un chapitre sur la retraduction dans le Handbook of Translation Studies (2010). Plus récemment encore, Deane-Cox (2014) a consacré une monographie au phénomène dans le champ de la traduction littéraire. La revue Target a quant à elle publié un numéro spécial intitulé “Voice in Retranslation” (2015), sous la rédaction de Alvstad et Assis Rosa.

 

Sous l’intitulé Retranslation in Context, deux conférences internationales tenues à l’université du Bosphore (Bo?aziçi University) à Istanboul en décembre 2013 et novembre 2015 ont en outre mis la retraduction à l’ordre du jour. Le présent appel à contributions s’inscrit dans la lignée de ces rencontres internationales qui se poursuivront dans le cadre d’un troisième colloque (RiC3) sur la retraduction, mais cette fois à l’université de Gand en Belgique néerlandophone.

 

Paloposki et Koskinen (2010, 30-31) ont fort justement constaté que si le phénomène de la retraduction avait été abordé sous plusieurs angles, il n’avait jamais encore été circonscrit avec précision et bien des assertions concernant cette problématique reposent encore trop souvent sur des observations intuitives. La présente initiative a pour objectif de permettre aux chercheurs en traductologie d’appréhender la retraduction par le biais d’approches multidisciplinaires qui permettront par l’étude des matériaux collectés de mieux cerner la problématique du processus qui consiste à envisager la retraduction d’un texte déjà traduit. Les contributions attendues se concentreront par exemple sur les différents aspects de la retraduction dans des études de cas, mais peuvent aussi s’étendre sur des considérations d’ordre méthodologique. Les analyses de cas concrets seront ainsi confrontés aux hypothèses théoriques qui peuvent en être induites.

 

Il reste entre autres à explorer toute l’histoire de la retraduction et ses interactions avec l’histoire de la traduction tout court ou encore le rôle des différents agents qu’implique le processus de retraduction dans la mise en place du canon de la litérature mondiale. Un certain nombre de motivations qui entraînent la retraduction ont été répertoriées, mais certains de ces facteurs (comme le vieillissement) n’ont guère fait l’objet d’études empiriques systématiques. Nous ignorons aussi dans quelle mesure il peut être question de progrès en matière de retraduction et si des études de réception peuvent démontrer ou non si ces progrès sont perçus par le public auquel les textes sont destinés. Il existe ainsi des cas de traducteurs qui, insatisfaits d’une première mouture, reviennent sur leur travail et s’en expliquent dans des paratextes. A un niveau plus général, dans un contexte de rapports de force entre cultures, il est légitme de se demander si les systèmes de littérature prépihérique présentent une autre politique de retraduction que la politique éditoriale des cultures dominantes. Il demeure intrigant de cerner en outre en quoi les versions antérieures diffèrent des retraductions plus tardives. Et faut-il parler dans certains cas de révision plutôt que de retraduction ? Qu’en est-il enfin des questions d’attribution et de plagiat ? Autant de champs qui restent à explorer.

 

Sans doute le domaine où la retraduction est le plus immédiatement prise en considération est-il celui de la littérature, mais la conférence désire élargir le débat en impliquant dans son champ d’activités les discours philosophiques, politiques ou médiatiques qui sont bien souvent déterinants dans la longue durée et la mise en place des structures profondes d’une civilisation. Traductions et retraductions gardent en outre souvent la trace de manipulations ou de stratégies de censure qui révèlent une communication complexe entre cultures.

 

Les contributions aborderont par conséquent sans exclusive tous les thèmes qui touchent à la retraduction, et en particulier :

  • L’histoire de la retraduction et le canon littéraire
  • Les motifs qui incitent à la retraduction (viellissement, idéologie,….)
  • Réception et retraduction
  • Auto-retraduction
  • La retraduction dans le système des rapports de force littéraires (centre et pépiphérie)
  • L’éthique de la retraduction (attribution, plagiat, copyright)
  • La retraduction de textes historiques, philosophiques, politiques
  • La retraduction de textes médiatiques

 

Bibliographie indicative :

Alvstad, C., Assis Rosa, A. (2015). “Voice in retranslation. An overview and some trends.” Target 27 (1), 3-24.

Bensimon, P. (1990). “Présentation.” Palimpsestes 4, ix–xiii.

Berman, A. (1990). “La Retraduction comme espace de traduction.” Palimpsestes 4, 1–7.

Brownlie, S. (2006). “Narrative theory and retranslation theory.” Across Languages and Cultures 7 (2), 145-170.

Deane-Cox, S. (2014). Retranslation. Translation, Literature and Reinterpretation. London/New Delhi/New York/Sydney: Bloomsbury.

Koskinen, K., Paloposki, O. (2010). “Retranslation.” In Y. Gambier, L. van Doorslaer (eds) Handbook of Translation Studies, Volume 1. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins, 294–298.

Paloposki, O., Koskinen, K. (2010). “Reprocessing texts. The Fine Line between Retranslating and Revising.” Across Languages and Cultures 11 (1), 29-49.

Tahir Gürça?lar, ?. (2009). “Retranslation.” In M. Baker, G. Saldanha (eds) Routledge Encyclopedia of Translation Studies. Second edition. London/New York: Routledge, 233-236.

 

Institutions organisatrices :

Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB)

Universiteit Gent (UGent)

Centre en Littérature et Traduction (CLIV)

Le Centre en Littérature et Traduction est un groupe interuniversitaire de recherche associant des chercheurs de la Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB) et de l’Universiteit Gent (UGent) (voir http://www.cliv.be).

 

Site web de la conférence : http://www.cliv.be/en/retranslationincontext3/

 

Langues de travail : anglais, français et néerlandais

 

Conférenciers invités :

Özlem Berk Albachten (Bo?aziçi University)

Kaisa Koskinen (University of Eastern Finland)

Outi Paloposki (University of Turku)

 

Comité organisateur :

Sonja Lavaert (VUB)

Arvi Sepp (VUB & UAntwerpen)

Yves T’Sjoen (UGent)

Piet Van Poucke (UGent)

 

Comité scientifique :

Özlem Berk Albachten (Bo?aziçi University)

Cecilia Alvstad (CLIV, University of Oslo)

Alexandra Assis Rosa (Universidade de Lisboa)

Michael Boyden (CLIV, Uppsala University)

Sharon Deane-Cox (University of Edinburgh)

Philippe Humblé (CLIV, Vrije Universiteit Brussel)

Natalia Kaloh Vid (CLIV, University of Maribor)

Kaisa Koskinen (University of Eastern Finland)

Ilse Logie (CLIV, Universiteit Gent)

Eric Metz (Universiteit van Amsterdam)

Reine Meylaerts (KULeuven)

Outi Paloposki (University of Turku)

?ehnaz Tahir Gürça?lar (Bo?aziçi University)

Andrew Samuel Walsh (Universidad Pontificia de Comillas, Madrid)

Patricia Willson (CLIV, Université de Liège)

 

Prière d’envoyer un résumé (max. 300 mots en anglais, français ou néerlandais) de votre contribution (dont la version définitive ne devra pas excéder 20 minutes) ainsi qu’une brève notice biographique (max. 150 mots) en un seul document à retranslation@UGent.be .

Date limite : le 1er juillet 2016.

Notification aux auteurs des propositions : 1er août 2016.